Running after Midnight

What’s it gonna be this time? What will this post look like in ten minutes? Blogging isn’t a chore for me—if it were I wouldn’t be doing it. I could write about the fact that the holes in my calendar between 14 classes are plugged with a record 11 meetings next week, but that borders on dismal. A calendar like that is what drives me to pound out a few words into cyberspace before plunging in to next week. Here goes.

The first step for a blog post is thinking up a name. As you may have noticed, many of my titles are also names of songs. Since all my posts tend to be repeats of each other I do this to give an appearance of randomality. I don’t give name selection more than a few minutes of simultaneous thought while coming up with content starter for the post. These aren’t names of favorite songs, or even songs that I’ve listened to. Using today’s name as an example, I typed “call me” (without searching) into Google search engine and patiently waited for it to drop down a list of search suggestions, with the thought of something down the line of the “Call me Ishmael” opening sentence of Moby Dick. One Google suggestion was “call me the breeze” and off we went to that Wikipedia page. From that band’s list of songs I combined “After Midnight” and “Nowhere to Run” to make “Running after Midnight.” There you have it; naming conventions from the master. More on running after midnight lower down on this page…

The next step in creating a blog post is to save a named file on my computer’s hard drive. This is a mandatory step because I use Microsoft Word 2007 to publish these posts and the live connection feature makes Word crash frequently. I’m used to it by now and rarely lose more than the few seconds it takes to restart the program. It’s not as bleak as it sounds.

That’s pretty much all there is to making a blog. O, yeah, and I have to let my fingers ramble over the keyboard for a few minutes to supply content.

Thursday evening we had a guest speaker here at the complex that specialized on the topic of Quarter-life Crises. I love living in a mature community, which is quite different than some of the places I’ve known populated with frat and sorority stereotypes. There is something to be said for individuals that have managed to go beyond the existence of passing out every night in a pool of puke, waking up sick, and calling it fun. Good times were had over babaganoush, pita bread, and tzatziki, thanks to a veggie chef in the audience. The food took me back to the little Israeli café in Tribeca, NYC that I’ve frequented over a dozen times. Back to the event, we talked a lot about wanderlust because most of us had been affected with it at one or more times in our lives. Several of the group were world travelers who had hitchhiked the world on pennies before coming to college. Another way this crisis shows up is in working insane hours and taking hard vacations, which is the thought that sparked the name of this post.

Running after midnight is something I’ve done too often when trying to figure out how in the world I was going to flip a house for profit before the 150k credit card debt came due, knowing one misstep or drop in market would send me to the bottom forever. Running after midnight was how to induce the deep sleep necessary to make 5 hour nights suffice. Then there were the vacations, which were often spent sleeping 12 hours a day far from home and familiar surroundings, staying in nice hotels, and eating in nice restaurants. It all seems so worthless but the experiences were priceless. And now the granddaddy of all crises—leaving a good job to attend college…

The conclusion of the quarter-life crisis meeting wasn’t entirely clear. Perhaps the main focus was to raise awareness and encourage affected individuals to use such a crisis to their advantage instead of letting it wipe out their future, and above all, to realize that this is not the end or constitution of life, but just a phase. To end with one of my favorite quotes: The consequences of doing nothing are often worse than making the wrong choice…

Buona giornata!

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