Windows 10

I took the dive and installed Windows 10. Or rather reinstalled it after running the Insider version since its release last year. Using the word Insider makes me feel important, but anyone can sign up to be an Windows Insider.

I was an early adopter of Windows Vista which turned out to be a disaster. Windows 7 was perfect and the Server 2008 R2 platform is rock solid. I used Windows 8 for awhile but removed it after a few months of frustration with full screen windows. It felt like a fix for something that wasn’t broken. I love Windows 7 because it does what I want. And, most importantly, it allows me to do what I want without getting in the way.

Multitasking is easier in Windows 10 because it finally supports multiple desktops. This is something Mac and Linux have offered for years. Sure, I can switch between windows for multitasking but by definition multitasking involves, well, multiple tasks. Not just multiple windows.

Other than multiple desktops, I haven’t really found anything groundbreaking about Windows 10. The Start menu is customizable to the pure functionality of Windows XP. The Classic theme is gone. Most of the apps I use work just fine. The start button search isn’t as good as Windows 7. The live tiles were deleted right away. It’s a little slower than Windows 7 with the sign-on process. (I’m on a domain with a local account).

I have no plans to move to Windows 10 for my daily driver workhorse PC. I’m disturbed by the shift here, from an operating system to a social platform. Social networking, cloud services, and live tiles are an integral part of the system. From a technology purist standpoint this is inefficient and bloated – from a privacy perspective it’s a non starter. I’ll keep it on the laptop for awhile as a long term test. It’ll be available free until next July so I’ll have a year to make the decision.

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